Browsing Tag

holidays

Jewish Inspiration December 6, 2018

Morocco and Menorahs

Tali is a super chatty middle-aged Sephardic Israeli woman who drove me to the airport on my recent trip to Israel. Her parents are Moroccan, and she recently traveled with them to Morocco for a visit. She told me that the Muslims in Morocco are so wonderful, kind and hospitable – they literally keep their doors open for guests. There is a reverent relationship from the Moroccan monarchy to the Jewish people, such that every Yom Kippur, at Neilah, the king comes himself to the Jewish synagogue to ask the congregants for a blessing. This is a tradition that has been practiced for years, passed down in the monarchy from father to son.

Jewish Inspiration September 7, 2018

Shana Tova

The air is cooler, softer. There are new starts, new school supplies, new shoes and haircuts (and backpacks and socks and hair accessories). “First day of second grade!” my social media accounts proclaim. The new season blows in the the new Jewish year. Lots of firsts.

Controversial Observations, Why Orthodox Jews do What they Do November 20, 2017

Why I Don’t Celebrate Thanksgiving

It used to be my embarrassing secret, like a schoolgirl who didn’t actually do her homework. Everyone would be talking about their turkeys, and guest lists, and leftovers, and I’m over here shopping for Shabbos dinner. After a number of years my husband would go buy some smoked turkey and have some on Thursday just so he could tell people he had his Thanksgiving turkey.

Uncategorized July 13, 2015

How to Eat What You Love and Not Get Fat… even if you keep Shabbos and every holiday and have a bar mitzvah every week

Looks like this is “how to” month here on OOTOB, but this is a follow up from my post about intuitive eating, and I think it’s important to address here because a few people have observed the “frum 10” (also known as the “frum 15”) which is the weight you gain when you become Orthodox and start eating Thanksgiving dinner twice a week plus a bar mitzvah or wedding thrown regularly into the mix.

Uncategorized April 6, 2015

Mah Nishtana

1. Why is this night different from all the other nights?

2. Why is my Seder different from all the other Seder?

3. Why is my kid different from all the other kids?

4. Why is my life different from all the other lives?

Why why why?